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Original Post Date: Thursday, July 16, 2009 In an article in last weeks Harvard Business , IT Costs: Do You Speak Their Language), John Sviokla discusses the fact that as the information business continues to grow it is increasingly important for organizations to understand the impact of IT as it relates to their operating costs. This certainly rings True to us here at PRICE Systems who have recognized this reality. TruePlanning 2009 has been developed by PRICE specifically to help organizations get their heads around the true costs of Information Technology. Application development projects can represent significant expense to an ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009  Bad project estimates lower profitability.  Despite this fact many business leaders don’t invest in improving their estimating capability, buying into the fatalistic myth that this is as good as it gets.  This is patently wrong.  Project portfolios are prioritized based on the total expected Return on Investment (ROI) of projects.  Investments in the wrong project based on bad estimates could lead to lost revenue or delay of net benefit. All around us we see reports of software projects which are over budget, delivered late or cancelled because they are taking too much time ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, April 30, 2009 It's finally Spring!  And along with the leaves on the trees, the beautiful flowers and the happy chirping birds.... it is once again Baseball Season.  Baseball season is a beautiful thing - and not just because, as a resident of South Jersey, my team is the 2008 World Champion Phillies.  I just love the game and everything about it.  I believe this is because with baseball the impossible becomes possible because anything can (and will) happen and with a good plan in place you can still be successful. I didn't always love baseball.  ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, April 2, 2009 I have to say that my foray into blogging has been an interesting one.  By definition, the Chief Scientist should be a nerdy sort of geek too high brow to pontificate on topics in such a pedestrian format.  Actually I kind of like it.  In part because I enjoy writing and I'm not picky about what I write - technical documents are OK but pontification works as well.  And in part because I know that in order to be a good writer in a particular genre one must read extensively from that ...
Original Post Date: Monday, March 23, 2009 Here’s a great article I happened upon while doing research for a paper I’m writing.  “Lessons Learned: IT’s Biggest Project Failures”  In this article we are treated to stories of IT projects that “first make people laugh and then” (hopefully) “make them think.”  As a long time student of the failed software project, I was neither surprise nor disappointed with the projects relayed.  The projects noted failed for reasons such as: Failure to perform a should-cost analysis before selecting a supplier Failure to recognize an unhealthy project before it ...
Original Post Date: Monday, March 9, 2009 The US Department of Defense (DOD) continues to be plagued with cost overruns on major weapons systems.  Last month Senators Carl Levin (D-Mich) and John McCain (R-Ariz) introduced the 2009 Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act intended to put measures in place to force the DOD to address the issues that cause overruns and schedule slippage.   Among other things,  this legislation would create the position of Director of Independent cost assessment for Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAPs) and require the DOD to perform trade-offs between cost, schedule and performance early in the program lifecycle. ...
Original Post Date: Friday, February 6, 2009 Last week I was asked to participate in Career Day at my son’s elementary school.  I was both honored and humbled.  Honored because the school felt that my career was something the children would be interested in and humbled because I was forced to concoct a story that would make cost estimating and analysis both understandable and interesting to children from kindergarten through grade eight.  Fortunately the format was such that I presented to each grade individually so at least I did not have to come up with one story to address ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, January 22, 2009  Like many others, I was astonished last Thursday by the images on my browser of those 155 extremely lucky people standing in the Hudson River.  And they certainly were very lucky last Thursday.  If you’re destined to fly on a flight bound for collision with birds, you want it to be piloted by a hero like Captain Sullenberger.  The incident made me think about what a hero is and how we all have the opportunities to be heroic in our chosen professions. According to Wikipedia, a hero refers to a character that, in ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2008 A recent Gartner report indicates that industry enthusiasm for SOA is waning.  The reasons cited are the lack of enough people with the proper skill sets to perform SOA deployments and the lack of a good business case for SOA.  It’s an interesting but not really unexpected direction.  SOA has been surrounded by significant hype, ensuring that organizations surveyed would be anxious to profess their desire to start a SOA project.  But as the rubber hits the road, these organizations are realizing that SOA may not be the answer to all of their ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, October 30, 2008  Software cost estimation is hard.  I have learned this the hard way – as a software developer and later as the manager of software development projects. Today, as a builder of cost estimating software, I learn something everyday about software development that reinforces the fact that software cost estimation is hard. I attend a lot of trade shows and I talk to a lot of software people about how they estimate software costs.  Many of them have no formal process, many don’t collect data as projects progress, many of them perform estimates off the ...