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Original Post Date: Thursday, February 17, 2011 My June blog entry suggested the use of parametrics in real-options valuation. This month, I’d like to offer the generalized use of our type of modeling in valuing tangible assets.  Typically, fundamental analysis evaluates the intrinsic value of securities. I won’t attempt to compete with Warren Buffet here. But it is certainly the case that a company, or portfolio of securities reflecting many companies, is based in part on the market value of its product assets and their potential for future earnings, as well as other objective and subjective considerations. In parametric estimation, we take a top-down ...
Original Post Date: Friday, December 3, 2010 Yesterday I had the pleasure of speaking at the New England SCEA Chapter December. The attendees were a great mix of experienced, seasoned cost estimators and young, new talent, eager to learn techniques to apply on the job.  My topic was the program management value of combining estimating Rules of Thumb with more rigorous cost estimating models and databases [link to presentation .pdf].  Rule of Thumb estimating is used every day by program managers to help guide their projects.  Oversight authorities rarely have the resources to perform detailed program estimates, so they ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 Recently a cost research project on missiles was completed. The research resulted in performance based equations for air-to-ground and surface-to-air missiles were developed. The performance based equations can be used for early concept estimation  on missile development and production costs. The question though is “What is the process for developing this type of estimating relationship?” This will be the first of a series of BLOGs on this topic.  The first task is to define what is a “Performance Based Equation?” Bruce Fad covered this definition in a previous “Data Driven BLOG” so please review his post for the details. The second step ...
Original Post Date: Monday, November 15, 2010 Last week I attended the 25th International Forum on COCOMO and Systems/Software Cost Modeling.  I attended for several reasons.  First of all, I was invited to participate on a panel whose topic was “25 years of Software Estimation: Lessons Learned, Challenges and Opportunities”.  Secondly, I have attended in the past and while it’s generally a small group, as such conferences go, I always come away impressed by the fact that so many smart people end up in one room and this year was no different.   But I digress; I really wanted to share ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 Here’s a cool project.  The Bloodhound Project  is focused on building a land vehicle capable of breaking the 1000mph speed barrier.  The mission of the project is twofold.  The first is to “overcome the impossible using science, technology, engineering and mathematics”.  But the second is more interesting – this project is intended as motivation for the upcoming generation to embrace technology related fields.  Britain doesn’t have enough students interested in such fields and they are worried about their ability to compete in technological forays going forward. But how much should something like this ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, September 23, 2010 You need 3 things for your software estimates to be successful. And I will add a fourth one in after I talk about the first 3. 1. You need qualified and experienced people to generate the estimates. They have to know how to estimate and they have to understand what the problem is that the project is going to solve…..at least well enough to estimate it. This can be one person or many depending on the difficulty of the business area. The harder it is, the better having more brains look at the problem. But not to the point ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 National Boss Day is quickly approaching! While October 16th is the actual day this year it will be observed on Oct 15th since the 16th falls on a Saturday and what boss wants to hear from his or her employees on a day off even to be showered with cards, flowers and accolades.  According to Barry Wood, Boss Day was started in 1958 when Patricia Bays Haroski of Deerfield Ill registered it as a special date with the US Chamber of Congress to honor her boss (who was also her father).  October ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 The key cost driver when estimating software costs is the size of the product. The problem is that there is no perfect technique available to measure and quantify the size of software. The two major techniques in use today are Source Lines of Code and Function Points.  Today we will talk about Source Lines or Code or SLOC. Source Lines of Code measures logical lines of code. It takes some of the uncertainty out of physical line of code measures by counting only complete statements (which can cross over more than on physical line). SLOC excludes comments and blank ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 Recently I came across the word “off-label”.  It is the term used by the medical community when a drug is used to treat a condition for which it has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.   We sometimes use TruePlanning for “off-label” purposes. A good example would be using the TruePlanning Calibration tool to answer such questions as, what is the maximum number of source lines of code (SLOC) I can get and remain within my budget?  I call this TruePlanning Optimization. Here is an example answering the SLOC question. First begin ...
Original Post Date: Monday, September 13, 2010  It's been brought to my attention that a post on hint fiction and hint project management, without a real example, is incomplete and unsatisfying.  To address this I have tied hint fiction to hint project management with the following story entitled "Another Day at the Office". Project problems abound; delays, turnover, scope creep.  Management concerns are palpable. Estimation exercise supports successful scope, schedule, cost negotiation.  Another rabbit out of the hat.