• Predictive Analytics for Improved Cost Management  



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Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 A good point is made in a comment to my last post, Chris Carter says, "As estimators I think it is our duty to tell our customer (management) what we assess the possible range of outcomes to be so that they can make use of this information ".  I agree that we should always deliver an indication of accuracy every estimate.  Uncertainty and risk analysis is an integral feature of TruePlanning and we educate our clients on the value of estimate ranges to optimizing project and portfolio performance. The uncertainty-based probabilistic confidence-level of an estimate that ...
Original Post Date: Friday, August 22, 2008 Software size measurement continues to be a contentious issue within the software industry.  While the software engineering community has made significant progress in it’s quest for the right way to assign value, the journey has not been without missteps and detours.  And there is still more work to be done. When I first started programming it never occurred to me to think about the size of the software I was developing.  This was true for several reasons.  First of all, back in the day, software had a tactile quality through the deck of punched ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 Recently a client approached me with a thought provoking inquiry.  They were interested in performing historical trend analysis on their software projects to support estimating software costs for future technologies.  They have done this for years with hardware procurements and wanted to start performing the same kind of analysis for software. For hardware it’s not that hard to do, we have tangibles like RAM size, processor speed, resolution, etc. The question they had for me was “What are likely candidates on which to perform historical trend analysis for software”.  Think about it.  What ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, August 12, 2008 I frequently attend trade shows and conferences focused on software development and/or cost estimating.  These shows provide a great opportunity for me to perform informal, unscientific surveys of the state of the software estimating discipline.  When queried on software estimating practices, more than half of those surveyed indicate a method that significantly resembles some attraction at a local carnival.  To the follow up question of “How’s that working for you?” the reply is almost always as expected – “Not too well”. As an industry we have failed pretty miserably at institutionalizing software estimating ...