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Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 True Planning results have many options, including viewing Costs by Activity. While simple, this view can be quite powerful, especially when exported for re-organization manipulation.  In a recent exercise, the WBS mapping of common objects, estimated by separate multiple scenarios, presented a non-trivial chore in Excel. “Transposition” features work fine for matrices, as do pivot tables. But how does one map object by activity grids into activity lists, similar to MIL-STD 881a, with singular “roll up” instances of all nonzero object costs?  The secret is in how True Planning appends each activity output with the [object] tag. Once exported ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 ...wear the worst shoes. The cobbler was a master at his craft; he was just too tired to practice it when he got home from the shop.  Sound familiar? A disciplined approach to understanding (functional) requirements as well as analogous projects (with actuals) is our not-so-secret sauce. Why run the risk of creeping back up our career learning curve? There’s already enough scope creep to keep us busy. Plus, for you management types charged with prospecting, a consistent approach towards estimation is a great way to connect with people who've felt the pain of being the cobbler's kids. I recently reconnected ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 In Parametrics is Free, I acknowledged receiving (too late) “you should’ve known to ask that” over the years. Quality control after-the-fact is fine; but it’s better and cheaper to take a systematic approach to quality assurance as part of your estimating process. The sheer volume of what we model can often keep us so close to the details that we are unable to step back and put on our QA hat on for a sanity check. Enter Quality! On a very large project, our team has introduced a few regular cross-checks, notwithstanding typical math check-sums.   A round table peer ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 In my blog last week on Work Breakdown Structures, we reviewed the subtleties of using the [object] tag to your advantage in creating different sorts and roll up subtotals. As a followup, I’d like to drill down a bit on the initial step of using the “copy grid” exports. Each row number is unique, thus creating an identifying key for the vlookup function in Excel. Since all object X activity instances are allocated 100% to one of the three phases (with very rare exception), these row keys allow you to sort and re-group outputs while maintaining ...
Original Post Date: Friday, March 4, 2011 I consistently run into this idea of data driven estimating.  Yet, there is no clear explanation of this concept.  I am not trying to provide one here, however, I am interested in is what is at the root of this growing movement.  My take is that it is an attempt to scratch an itch.  But what’s the itch? I believe it is related to my early post (Accuracy is Risky Business).  In the struggle to answer the accuracy question people have decided that understanding the data used in the estimating process is key ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011 The concept of the fuel cell was first published in 1938 by Christian Friedrich Schonbein.  Based on this publication Sir William Grove invented the precursor of the fuel cell in 1839. The Grove Cell created current by applying two acids to zinc and platinum electrodes separated by a porous ceramic pot.  In 1842 Grove developed the first actual fuel cell which produced electricity with hydrogen and oxygen, much like many fuel cells in use today. Fuel cells remained an intellectual curiosity until the 1960’s when the US space program identified a requirement for ...
Original Post Date: Monday, February 28, 2011 PRICE Systems recently accepted an assignment to complete a "Should Cost" estimate for a U.S. ally on a weapon system. The estimate included not only analysis on production costs, but also should cost on various operations and support costs. The only information provided by the client was quantity and time frame for production. A major ground rule for the estimate was that all data specific to the weapon system must come from publicly available information.  For example, mass, manufacturing process, and learning curve information must come from the public domain.  After reviewing the scope for the estimate, we decided to also ...
Original Post Date: Monday, February 28, 2011 I recently attended the Wharton Aerospace Conference and Federal Networks 2011.  Amid the obligatory discussions about the economic climate and federal budget deficit, an interesting topic bubbled up.  There  was a certain preoccupation with an idea called ‘consumerism.’  According to Webster, consumerism means "...the promotion of the consumer's interests; the theory that an increasing consumption of goods is economically desirable; a preoccupation with and an inclination towards the buying of consumer goods." As is often the case, there is a difference between definition and connotation. The intended meaning of consumerism at these events was the ...
Original Post Date: Friday, February 25, 2011 PRICE Systems is currently developing a COM interface for TruePlanning. I know, I know…  What’s COM you say? COM stands for (Component Object Model) and it's a programmable interface which exposes the TruePlanning estimating brains for integration and analysis!  I know it sounds boring but it’s really cool because it allows anyone, including our users, to build “apps” for TruePlanning similar to the way “apps” are built for the iPhone.  Let me give you some examples of some apps that you can build:  Excel solution, sensitivity analysis,  project comparison, risk simulation, total cost of ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 In the world of estimating, accuracy is the first question out of people’s mouths.  Above all else they want to know the accuracy of an estimate.  How accurate is that approximate judgment?  Craziness! True accuracy can only be determined after the project or effort has been completed and a post-audit analysis reconciles what was expected to happen with what did happen.  This is a very expensive, time consuming process that many preach about but few actually attempt.  In my experience, when people ask about accuracy what they are really interested in is ...