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Original Post Date: Friday, January 15, 2010 Failed software projects are always bad but there are additional complications when there is a contract in place to deliver the software.  Disputes over failed software can result in costly litigation that generally damages both the vendor and the buyer. According to observations of Capers Jones in "Conflict and Litigation Between Software Clients and Developers" (2007) , 5% of the projects his clients were involved in either had litigation pending or were currently involved in litigation over project failures.  His findings indicate that it is very large projects, over 10,000 Function Points that ...
Original Post Date: Friday, November 20, 2009 Bill Scheessele’s article in the Washington Technology, Time for a hard look at marketing strategies, is a quick read about organization’s reacting to these new economic conditions. He suggests that most organizations are... "Attempting to move forward with an obsolete business development operation, reacting to fewer opportunities and shifting budgets by shedding business development personnel, sticking with an outdated business development process that everyone in the industry uses, or doing nothing while waiting on the sidelines for conditions to change are not reasonable decisions." This is further supported by the recent flurry of acquisitions both ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 16, 2009 While most of the books on the topic of parametric modeling take a look at detailed techniques and fundamentals, such as building parent/child relationships or the mathematics behind models, Systems Cost Engineering, takes a more practical perspective to answer a very basic question:  What can parametric estimating do for my organization and how can we implement it?  The book covers an array of business processes that can be dramatically improved with the application of a standardized parametric cost estimating framework. These processes exist across multiple phases of a program's lifecycle such as early concept planning through development and production. Chapters are ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, August 13, 2009 Let’s start with a simple test. Which is greater: the number of six-letter English words that have "n" as the fifth letter or the number of six-letter words ending in "ing"? If you are like most people you’re thinking the correct answer is six-letter words ending in "ing". But most people are wrong. And the reason is simple, people rely on what they can easily recall. Since it’s much easier to think of 6-letter words ending in "ing" the fact that people come to that conclusion isn't surprising. Psychologists refer to this as availability bias. ...
Original Post Date: Monday, July 20, 2009  Did you know that according to kgb a single Google search takes 0.2g of Carbon Dioxide? Asking Google 2 questions is equivalent to boiling a tea kettle full of water.  If there were 2 billion Google searches a day in 2008, today we're looking at more than 400 Million g of Carbon Dioxide a day just for Google searches.  A part of my job at PRICE is to look into emerging trends and technologies to determine if and how changes in the world impact the costs of hardware, software and information technology projects.  ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, July 16, 2009 In an article in last weeks Harvard Business , IT Costs: Do You Speak Their Language), John Sviokla discusses the fact that as the information business continues to grow it is increasingly important for organizations to understand the impact of IT as it relates to their operating costs. This certainly rings True to us here at PRICE Systems who have recognized this reality. TruePlanning 2009 has been developed by PRICE specifically to help organizations get their heads around the true costs of Information Technology. Application development projects can represent significant expense to an ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009  Bad project estimates lower profitability.  Despite this fact many business leaders don’t invest in improving their estimating capability, buying into the fatalistic myth that this is as good as it gets.  This is patently wrong.  Project portfolios are prioritized based on the total expected Return on Investment (ROI) of projects.  Investments in the wrong project based on bad estimates could lead to lost revenue or delay of net benefit. All around us we see reports of software projects which are over budget, delivered late or cancelled because they are taking too much time ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, April 30, 2009 It's finally Spring!  And along with the leaves on the trees, the beautiful flowers and the happy chirping birds.... it is once again Baseball Season.  Baseball season is a beautiful thing - and not just because, as a resident of South Jersey, my team is the 2008 World Champion Phillies.  I just love the game and everything about it.  I believe this is because with baseball the impossible becomes possible because anything can (and will) happen and with a good plan in place you can still be successful. I didn't always love baseball.  ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, April 2, 2009 I have to say that my foray into blogging has been an interesting one.  By definition, the Chief Scientist should be a nerdy sort of geek too high brow to pontificate on topics in such a pedestrian format.  Actually I kind of like it.  In part because I enjoy writing and I'm not picky about what I write - technical documents are OK but pontification works as well.  And in part because I know that in order to be a good writer in a particular genre one must read extensively from that ...
Original Post Date: Monday, March 23, 2009 Here’s a great article I happened upon while doing research for a paper I’m writing.  “Lessons Learned: IT’s Biggest Project Failures”  In this article we are treated to stories of IT projects that “first make people laugh and then” (hopefully) “make them think.”  As a long time student of the failed software project, I was neither surprise nor disappointed with the projects relayed.  The projects noted failed for reasons such as: Failure to perform a should-cost analysis before selecting a supplier Failure to recognize an unhealthy project before it ...