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Original Post Date: Thursday, September 23, 2010 You need 3 things for your software estimates to be successful. And I will add a fourth one in after I talk about the first 3. 1. You need qualified and experienced people to generate the estimates. They have to know how to estimate and they have to understand what the problem is that the project is going to solve…..at least well enough to estimate it. This can be one person or many depending on the difficulty of the business area. The harder it is, the better having more brains look at the problem. But not to the point ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 National Boss Day is quickly approaching! While October 16th is the actual day this year it will be observed on Oct 15th since the 16th falls on a Saturday and what boss wants to hear from his or her employees on a day off even to be showered with cards, flowers and accolades.  According to Barry Wood, Boss Day was started in 1958 when Patricia Bays Haroski of Deerfield Ill registered it as a special date with the US Chamber of Congress to honor her boss (who was also her father).  October ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 Over the past several weeks several users have inquired about the best way to model legacy software that is being modified when estimating software costs. The software component within the TruePlanning Software model has an input parameter call “adapted Code Size.” This input parameter accounts for existing or legacy software that will be modified or changed to meet a new requirement. Tied with the size input parameter is Percent Design/Code/Test adapted. Although the model will calculate a percentage for each input, I would recommend that user’s analyze the calculate values and override the calculation where required. The percentage ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 The key cost driver when estimating software costs is the size of the product. The problem is that there is no perfect technique available to measure and quantify the size of software. The two major techniques in use today are Source Lines of Code and Function Points.  Today we will talk about Source Lines or Code or SLOC. Source Lines of Code measures logical lines of code. It takes some of the uncertainty out of physical line of code measures by counting only complete statements (which can cross over more than on physical line). SLOC excludes comments and blank ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 Earlier this month Under Secretary of Defense, Asthon Carter, spoke at the 2010 Annual Air and Space Conference. His speech touched on some of the 5 categories that he and Defense Secretary Robert Gates laid out in order to identify low value activities and reapportion approximately $100 billion dollars within the Defense Budget to higher value capabilities needed to support US Forces. The first of those categories he described has to do with "targeting affordability".  In the context of a specific Navy program he explained this concept in a simple practical manner:  "The way to do that is ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 Recently I came across the word “off-label”.  It is the term used by the medical community when a drug is used to treat a condition for which it has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.   We sometimes use TruePlanning for “off-label” purposes. A good example would be using the TruePlanning Calibration tool to answer such questions as, what is the maximum number of source lines of code (SLOC) I can get and remain within my budget?  I call this TruePlanning Optimization. Here is an example answering the SLOC question. First begin ...
Original Post Date: Monday, September 13, 2010  It's been brought to my attention that a post on hint fiction and hint project management, without a real example, is incomplete and unsatisfying.  To address this I have tied hint fiction to hint project management with the following story entitled "Another Day at the Office". Project problems abound; delays, turnover, scope creep.  Management concerns are palpable. Estimation exercise supports successful scope, schedule, cost negotiation.  Another rabbit out of the hat.
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2010 Because I have enrolled in several on-line fiction writing workshops, I regularly receive newsletters about upcoming events in the world of fiction writing.  Several weeks ago I was quite intrigued when I received an invitation to enter a ‘Hint Fiction’ writing contest.  Here I don’t even know what hint fiction is and someone thinks I might be good enough at it to enter a contest – who knew?    Naturally, I Googled hint fiction (how did we get by without Google?) and found out that it is  “a story of 25 words or ...
Original Post Date: Friday, August 13, 2010 If you want to read an interesting article on EVM – check out ‘The Three Deadly Sins of EVM’  by Mike Mullaly.  In it he reflects some of my personal feelings about EVM but he does this much more eloquently than ‘it’s a crock’.  OK – while I have actually said that out loud – it’s probably a little too strong.  I do think that EVM may be a good tool to have in the toolbox – it’s just not the project panacea that so many make it out to be.  And it ...
Original Post Date: Friday, July 30, 2010 Earlier this week I presented a webinar on the topic of SOA governance – specifically focused on making sure that organizations include SOA governance as they plan to deploy SOA capabilities.  As sometimes happens when I am giving a presentation (especially one I have given before), I was struck with somewhat of an epiphany as I was relaying the material on my slides.  In this case it was not really a new idea about the material, but more a deeper understanding of why this topic really is important. To be honest, when I first ...