• Predictive Analytics for Improved Cost Management  



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Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) are integrated circuits designed to be configured by a designer after manufacturing.  In recent years, FPGA usage has been increasing at a rapid pace, as their capability (speed, energy efficiency, amount of logic that can fit on the chip, etc.) has come to rival ASICs.  As both the number and size of FPGA projects has increased, improving methods of cost estimation of these projects is becoming more critical for project success. FPGA development combines aspects of both hardware development and software development.  These projects begin with architectural design and writing code in a Hardware Description ...
Check out this article on “The History and Purpose of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM)” (https://toughnickel.com/business/The-History-and-Purpose-of-the-Capability-Maturity-Model-CMM) It provides an interesting and thought provoking accounting of how the Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU’s) Software Engineering Institute (SEI) came to be and how the quest of NASA and the US Air Force lead the charge to improve software quality.  According to the article – “The Capability Maturity Model was developed to ensure success when success really matters – at NASA and in the military where lives are on the line and success is survival”.  The problem the industry had with this quest ...
In my previous blog, I discussed the newly available in TP2016.0 (16.0.6187.2) API feature of calibration. Now reliable and repeatable calibrations can be set up through the TruePlanning API easily and quickly. For most users the standard calibration usage will be all they need. That said, there are some users who would like to use a feature that is available the TruePlanning Calibration GUI: the ability to calibrate multiple inputs in one calibration.  The most common reason to use a constant in a calibration is to find a single value, such as Organizational Productivity, across multiple Cost Objects that yields ...
Of the many features that help TruePlanning stand out as the premier predictive cost analytics tool, TruePlanning’s ability to calibrate is frequently cited by users as the most important feature in TruePlanning. Users can create models that are highly tuned to the organizations and processes that they are modelling. The 50,000-foot description of calibration is to increase the fidelity of a model to a known process or organization by using ‘actuals’ (known result data) and driving TruePlanning inputs so that the known values are obtained. A concrete example would be knowing the number of hours it took create a ...
Check out the November/December issue of Crosstalk (http://www.crosstalkonline.org/issues/novdec-2016.html) “Beyond the Agile Manifesto.”  Here you will find several really great articles on the uses and the future of agile development.  As usual I started at the end with David Cook’s Backtalk article – “Too Agile for my Own Good”( http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/702523/27309805/1477697823283/201611-Cook.pdf?token=ayD00sE4rcknGJpn6XEk1O08YBk%3D).  Cook not only shared whimsical information about his favorite grocery items along with his curmudgeon-like  frustration with the stores insistence on changing things up occasionally by moving familiar items to unfamiliar locations throughout the store.  Cook admits however that this behavior – while originally annoying has resulted in improvements in the ...
Crowdsourcing is the practice of harnessing the power of the crowd to solve problems or accomplish certain tasks.  The expression Crowdsourcing was coined as a portmanteau of the words crowd and outsourcing.  While advances in technology have pushed this practice to the forefront recently – the notion has been around for a long time. It is a participative online activity where questions and tasks are proposed by an individual or organization via a particular crowdsourcing platform.  Individuals or groups of individuals who belong to that community – accept the challenge and attempt to answer the question or complete the proposed ...
One of the most frequently asked questions from new users is:  At what level should I be estimating my project in TruePlanning®?  To be clear, the question involves how detailed the product breakdown structure should be.  The answers can vary widely, as seen in the two examples below for an aircraft. Figure 1.  F-22 template available in TruePlanning® 2016 Note: subassemblies collapsed to fit PBS onto one page.   Figure 2.  F-22 estimated as one hardware cost object. The preceding examples might be extreme ends of a spectrum.  In the first example, we have provided a template in TruePlanning® 2016 that models a fighter ...
We have all likely heard of “should cost” estimates.  Boiled down: If everything goes as planned, how much should program cost?  Are there efficiencies or best practices we can employ to get the job done faster and cheaper?  We may use analogies, parametrics, bottom up estimates, or extrapolation of actual costs to make a determination.  How many of us have heard of “should price”?  “Should price” is the determination of reasonableness of price for commercial items.  When contracting personnel receive quotes for off-the-shelf items, they need tools at their disposal to determine if the item is fairly priced.  On ...
Recently, I was contacted by an Air Force estimator with a novel challenge.  The estimator’s product breakdown structure modeled the development and production of various hardware items over several years.  TruePlanning can easily assist in spreading production quantities or tracking “ship sets” of items required for a weapon system.  In this case, the user wished to have different quantities for different items.  Typically, we use a System cost object or the System Folder to spread production, which is then attributed to all components within the estimate.  Coming up with multiple production schedules within the same estimate presented a challenge. In ...
In the previous (second) blog in this series, we discussed using the NIST Special Publication 800-171 Appendix E to list all possible cyber security requirements.  We then down selected the entire list of 123 items into roughly 60 that may directly impact the software development process.  Now, we will cover how the impact of those 60 items could possibly be included in a TruePlanning® estimate. I will offer three primary methods for accounting for additional effort of cyber security requirements.  We will look at modeling the requirements as individual cost objects in the estimate.  We will then consider setting inputs ...