• Predictive Analytics for Improved Cost Management  



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Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 A frequent question from students and consulting clients is how to estimate software size when either: detailed functional requirements descriptions are not yet documented or, even if the latter do exist, the resources necessary (in cost and time) for detailed function point (“FP”) counting are prohibitive. If appropriate analogies or detailed use cases are not available, fast function point counting can be a non-starter, without nominal understanding of pre-design software transactions and data functions.  Hence, the challenge is to find an estimating basis for functional measure (i.e., ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 We’re building a tool that quickly and easily allows you to map costs in your TruePlanning(R) projects to any custom Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), including templates for the MIL-STD-881C.  By mapping TruePlanning costs to fit your point of view, you can make use of your organization’s existing research, and ensure that your cost estimates are complete, realistic, and can be easily compared to other projects apples-to-apples.  This is great for AoAs and analyzing where and why costs differ between various solutions (not to mention 881C mapping is a required deliverable for major ...
Original Post Date: Monday, September 24, 2012 The purpose of this blog is to describe the role Value Engineering plays within the affordability process. The blog is not a step by step “How To Conduct or Execute” Value Engineering (VE) but, it is a discussion of the context, input, setup, execution hints, and output of Value Engineering in support of conducting affordability analysis and management. As such, it is important to understand the concept of affordability within the Systems Engineering paradigm. This blog is designed to provide insights, lessons learned, and suggestions for using Value Engineering in the affordability process. In ...
Original Post Date: Friday, September 7, 2012 So, what goes on out here in the corn fields, anyway?  Did you know Dayton, Ohio is home to the Air Force Materiel Command?  Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), headquartered at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, “develops, acquires and sustains the aerospace power needed to defend the United States and its interests for today and tomorrow. This is accomplished through management, research, acquisition, development, testing and maintenance of existing and future weapons systems and their components” (afmc.af.mil).   In response to future budget uncertainty and a challenge by Congress to operate more efficiently, AFMC recently ...
Original Post Date: Monday, March 26, 2012 In my research on project management and cost estimation, I often come across three different “breakdown structures” which are useful in dissecting a project from various points of view.  The work breakdown structure (WBS) is oriented around project deliverables; it breaks a system down into subsystems, components, tasks and work packages.  The organization breakdown structure (OBS) shows the structure of the organizations involved in the project, including how these organizations break down into sites, divisions, teams, etc.  Finally, the cost breakdown structure (CBS) examines a project in terms of useful cost categories, ...
Original Post Date: Friday, June 10, 2011 I’m on my way home from the ISPA/SCEA (International Society of Parametric Analysts, Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis) Conference held in Albuquerque this week.  Attendance was very good (2nd best in the conferences history) and as the content seemed especially good this week.  I attended lots of good talks on topics ranging from SEPM (System Engineering, Project Management) cost estimating, Joint Confidence Levels, Software Estimating, Affordability,  Agile software development and estimating for Enterprise Resource Planning Systems.   Of course, just because the topics are good and well presented doesn’t mean I have ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, May 19, 2011 I was recently asked by a client to provide a synopsis of what TruePlanning offers in response to the Ashton Carter Memorandum – Implementation of Will-Cost and Should-Cost Management. In the memo, the Undersecretary of Defense AT&L listed “Selected Ingredients of Should Cost Management”. It was interesting to note how much capability is provided by TruePlanning to effectively support efficient should cost management. In this month’s blog, I will share with my response to our client with you. ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, April 5, 2011  In 1961 at the MIT Centennial, John McCarthy opined “if computers of the kind I have advocated become the computers of the future, then computing may someday be organized as a public utility just as the telephone system is a public utility…. the computer utility could become the basis of a new and important industry”  [1].  In 2006, Amazon Web Services was launched providing computing on a utility basis.  Since that time the notion of cloud computing has been emerging and evolving. Cloud computing is a paradigm that makes the notion of utility ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 ...wear the worst shoes. The cobbler was a master at his craft; he was just too tired to practice it when he got home from the shop.  Sound familiar? A disciplined approach to understanding (functional) requirements as well as analogous projects (with actuals) is our not-so-secret sauce. Why run the risk of creeping back up our career learning curve? There’s already enough scope creep to keep us busy. Plus, for you management types charged with prospecting, a consistent approach towards estimation is a great way to connect with people who've felt the pain of being the cobbler's kids. I recently reconnected ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, March 10, 2011 My previous blog discussed a “Should Cost” methodology used by PRICE Systems to complete an analysis. In the article I included a chart depicting calibration results for manufacturing complexities for each weapon system (X-Axis). Manufacturing complexities are a major cost driver within the model. This parameter can be derived from model knowledge tables, generators or from calibration. Many times the calibrated results are simply averaged and used for predicting cost for the new system. This assumes that the new system is very similar in technology and performance as the systems used for calibration. In general this is not the ...