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Original Post Date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 Unfortunately this is a true story. I decided to have a couple of gold fish in a nice glass bowl, having done my sums I estimated the cost should be: Bowl £20.00 Gravel £5.00 Two gold fish £8.00 Food £4.00 Making a total of £37.00, ok I can afford this, off I go to the pet shop. The pet shop advised “fish don’t like bowls”, plus “it’s cruel to keep them in one”, but as a child I often won fish at the ...
Original Post Date: Monday, November 15, 2010 Last week I attended the 25th International Forum on COCOMO and Systems/Software Cost Modeling.  I attended for several reasons.  First of all, I was invited to participate on a panel whose topic was “25 years of Software Estimation: Lessons Learned, Challenges and Opportunities”.  Secondly, I have attended in the past and while it’s generally a small group, as such conferences go, I always come away impressed by the fact that so many smart people end up in one room and this year was no different.   But I digress; I really wanted to share ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, November 2, 2010  After some recent meetings with clients I am sensing some confusion on how to estimate software reuse. I think part of the problem is in the definition of reuse, so let's start with a definition and then address the estimating issue. Software reuse is defined as “the use of existing software, or software knowledge, to build new software.” This definition came from Wikipedia. From a estimating software costs perspective the above definition is part of the problem. The definition should read: "Use of existing software with no changes for operation in the new software program.”  If the existing software is going to be changed, ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 Here’s a cool project.  The Bloodhound Project  is focused on building a land vehicle capable of breaking the 1000mph speed barrier.  The mission of the project is twofold.  The first is to “overcome the impossible using science, technology, engineering and mathematics”.  But the second is more interesting – this project is intended as motivation for the upcoming generation to embrace technology related fields.  Britain doesn’t have enough students interested in such fields and they are worried about their ability to compete in technological forays going forward. But how much should something like this ...
Original Post Date: Friday, July 30, 2010 Earlier this week I presented a webinar on the topic of SOA governance – specifically focused on making sure that organizations include SOA governance as they plan to deploy SOA capabilities.  As sometimes happens when I am giving a presentation (especially one I have given before), I was struck with somewhat of an epiphany as I was relaying the material on my slides.  In this case it was not really a new idea about the material, but more a deeper understanding of why this topic really is important. To be honest, when I first ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Which came first the chicken or the egg?  We can look to Darwin for one theory, the Bible for another but at the end of the day – nobody really knows.  There can be no chicken without an egg, nor there be an egg with no chicken.  Thus we are left with a bit of a circuitous conundrum. Joint Confidence Level (JCL), NASA’s current best practice for program planning and management, also presents a circuitous conundrum.  When a program has a JCL of 70% this implies that there is a 70% confidence that ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2010  I recently read a great paper by Glenn Buttes and Kent Linton, NASA’s Joint Confidence Level Paradox – A History of Denial.   In it, the authors present a  very detailed analysis of many failed NASA projects along with some compelling theories on why so many projects fail and what can be done going forward.  While I’m not here to summarize their findings – interested parties can hit the link above and learn for themselves, there was one extremely interesting jewel in this paper that I felt the need to share. The reason I ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, May 13, 2010  Earlier this week I conducted a webinar intended to make PRICE users aware of the Cost Research Services available to them as part of the license fee they pay to use PRICE products. I thought I would recap the highlights of this webinar for those of you who might have missed it. At PRICE we understand that cost estimating tools, while useful and valuable, do not always present the complete solution. Every single cost estimation projects presents new and unique challenges.  We think it's important that in addition to solid, time trusted cost estimating models, ...
Original Post Date: Friday, April 2, 2010  The newest version of TruePlanning has been released and distributed to customers. The new features were designed to make it easier to estimate entire systems, not just individual components or sub-systems. TruePlanning is an excellent solution in this regards. Systems that require you to estimate software costs, hardware costs, and the integration of multiple pieces of each can all be done in one framework. There are  specific features in this release, like input inheritance, that allow you to make changes at the top Project level which then flow throughout the entire system.  This saves an ...
Original Post Date: Friday, January 15, 2010 Failed software projects are always bad but there are additional complications when there is a contract in place to deliver the software.  Disputes over failed software can result in costly litigation that generally damages both the vendor and the buyer. According to observations of Capers Jones in "Conflict and Litigation Between Software Clients and Developers" (2007) , 5% of the projects his clients were involved in either had litigation pending or were currently involved in litigation over project failures.  His findings indicate that it is very large projects, over 10,000 Function Points that ...