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Original Post Date: Monday, March 28, 2011  So how did your basketball picks go this season?  My bracket is officially closed since absolutely no one picked any of the final four teams!   I am happy to report that I came in second with a whopping 36 correct picks - picks that most would judge to be pretty bad.  So where did we go wrong? Since I don’t really follow college basketball closely during the year I make my picks somewhat randomly – loosely based on the teams' standing but occasionally predicting an upset.  Naturally, the upsets I predicted were not ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011 The concept of the fuel cell was first published in 1938 by Christian Friedrich Schonbein.  Based on this publication Sir William Grove invented the precursor of the fuel cell in 1839. The Grove Cell created current by applying two acids to zinc and platinum electrodes separated by a porous ceramic pot.  In 1842 Grove developed the first actual fuel cell which produced electricity with hydrogen and oxygen, much like many fuel cells in use today. Fuel cells remained an intellectual curiosity until the 1960’s when the US space program identified a requirement for ...
Original Post Date: Friday, February 11, 2011 The DoD Cost Analysis Symposium (DODCAS 2011) is next week, Feb 15-18.  I’ll be there along with several of my colleagues at PRICE Systems.  This conference consistently provides an excellent source of information and shared experiences for the acquisition community and I am anxious to attend again this year.  Last year the conference occurred shortly after Congress passed the Weapons System Acquisition Reform Act of 2009 (WSARA) - and the majority of the sessions were focused on discussions about how the services, contractors and the government leadership planned on dealing with this new law.  From ...
Original Post Date: Monday, January 17, 2011 While I don’t like to admit to visiting a website entitled geekArticles.com, I did stumble across a reprint of an essay by Grant Rule “Bees and the Art of Estimating”  that some of you may find interesting and instructive.  The author participates in his own form of “Estimation Trivia” by posing the following challenge “Take paper and pencil and write your estimate for the number of insects in the average hive of English honeybees.”  Of the approximately 1100 software measurement and process improvement professionals he has challenged thusly,  only about 10 have ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, December 23, 2010 A current research interest of mine is fuel cells – where they are being used and what it costs to manufacture fuel cell systems.  I thought I would share some of what I’ve learned to date. A fuel cell is an electrochemical cell which converts some fuel, usually hydrogen, into electric current.  It does this through a reaction between the fuel and an oxidant in the presence of an electrolyte.  The waste product of this chemical process is water and heat.  Fuel cells, unlike conventional batteries, consume reactant from an external source ...
Original Post Date: Monday, November 15, 2010 Last week I attended the 25th International Forum on COCOMO and Systems/Software Cost Modeling.  I attended for several reasons.  First of all, I was invited to participate on a panel whose topic was “25 years of Software Estimation: Lessons Learned, Challenges and Opportunities”.  Secondly, I have attended in the past and while it’s generally a small group, as such conferences go, I always come away impressed by the fact that so many smart people end up in one room and this year was no different.   But I digress; I really wanted to share ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 Here’s a cool project.  The Bloodhound Project  is focused on building a land vehicle capable of breaking the 1000mph speed barrier.  The mission of the project is twofold.  The first is to “overcome the impossible using science, technology, engineering and mathematics”.  But the second is more interesting – this project is intended as motivation for the upcoming generation to embrace technology related fields.  Britain doesn’t have enough students interested in such fields and they are worried about their ability to compete in technological forays going forward. But how much should something like this ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 National Boss Day is quickly approaching! While October 16th is the actual day this year it will be observed on Oct 15th since the 16th falls on a Saturday and what boss wants to hear from his or her employees on a day off even to be showered with cards, flowers and accolades.  According to Barry Wood, Boss Day was started in 1958 when Patricia Bays Haroski of Deerfield Ill registered it as a special date with the US Chamber of Congress to honor her boss (who was also her father).  October ...
Original Post Date: Monday, September 13, 2010  It's been brought to my attention that a post on hint fiction and hint project management, without a real example, is incomplete and unsatisfying.  To address this I have tied hint fiction to hint project management with the following story entitled "Another Day at the Office". Project problems abound; delays, turnover, scope creep.  Management concerns are palpable. Estimation exercise supports successful scope, schedule, cost negotiation.  Another rabbit out of the hat.
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2010 Because I have enrolled in several on-line fiction writing workshops, I regularly receive newsletters about upcoming events in the world of fiction writing.  Several weeks ago I was quite intrigued when I received an invitation to enter a ‘Hint Fiction’ writing contest.  Here I don’t even know what hint fiction is and someone thinks I might be good enough at it to enter a contest – who knew?    Naturally, I Googled hint fiction (how did we get by without Google?) and found out that it is  “a story of 25 words or ...