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Original Post Date: Friday, August 13, 2010 If you want to read an interesting article on EVM – check out ‘The Three Deadly Sins of EVM’  by Mike Mullaly.  In it he reflects some of my personal feelings about EVM but he does this much more eloquently than ‘it’s a crock’.  OK – while I have actually said that out loud – it’s probably a little too strong.  I do think that EVM may be a good tool to have in the toolbox – it’s just not the project panacea that so many make it out to be.  And it ...
Original Post Date: Friday, July 30, 2010 Earlier this week I presented a webinar on the topic of SOA governance – specifically focused on making sure that organizations include SOA governance as they plan to deploy SOA capabilities.  As sometimes happens when I am giving a presentation (especially one I have given before), I was struck with somewhat of an epiphany as I was relaying the material on my slides.  In this case it was not really a new idea about the material, but more a deeper understanding of why this topic really is important. To be honest, when I first ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Which came first the chicken or the egg?  We can look to Darwin for one theory, the Bible for another but at the end of the day – nobody really knows.  There can be no chicken without an egg, nor there be an egg with no chicken.  Thus we are left with a bit of a circuitous conundrum. Joint Confidence Level (JCL), NASA’s current best practice for program planning and management, also presents a circuitous conundrum.  When a program has a JCL of 70% this implies that there is a 70% confidence that ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2010  I recently read a great paper by Glenn Buttes and Kent Linton, NASA’s Joint Confidence Level Paradox – A History of Denial.   In it, the authors present a  very detailed analysis of many failed NASA projects along with some compelling theories on why so many projects fail and what can be done going forward.  While I’m not here to summarize their findings – interested parties can hit the link above and learn for themselves, there was one extremely interesting jewel in this paper that I felt the need to share. The reason I ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, May 13, 2010  Earlier this week I conducted a webinar intended to make PRICE users aware of the Cost Research Services available to them as part of the license fee they pay to use PRICE products. I thought I would recap the highlights of this webinar for those of you who might have missed it. At PRICE we understand that cost estimating tools, while useful and valuable, do not always present the complete solution. Every single cost estimation projects presents new and unique challenges.  We think it's important that in addition to solid, time trusted cost estimating models, ...
Original Post Date: Friday, April 23, 2010 Software project failures coupled with rapidly changing business needs are forcing organizations to revisit the way they go about building software.  Agile development has emerged as one possible solution to the woes of the software industry.  Agile enthusiasts claim significant increases in productivity and quality, while detractors cite instances where the reverse is true.  It seems to me that probably both are right  - some of the time anyway.  Agile means many different things to different organization.  There is a long list of agile tenets but not every method of agile applies all ...
Original Post Date: lThursday, April 8, 2010 Despite the plethora of literature on Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) it remains a difficult concept.  I thought I would share my interpretation. For most of us the concept of technology readiness is hard to grasp. This is because in general, our experiences with technology are with fully matured technology. In 1961, President Kennedy challenged US scientists, mathematicians and engineers when he announced that within the decade of the 1960s the US would ‘land a man on the Moon, and return him safely to Earth’. At the time, there were no solutions to solve ...
Original Post Date: Friday, January 15, 2010 Failed software projects are always bad but there are additional complications when there is a contract in place to deliver the software.  Disputes over failed software can result in costly litigation that generally damages both the vendor and the buyer. According to observations of Capers Jones in "Conflict and Litigation Between Software Clients and Developers" (2007) , 5% of the projects his clients were involved in either had litigation pending or were currently involved in litigation over project failures.  His findings indicate that it is very large projects, over 10,000 Function Points that ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 Recently I was interviewed by Doug Beizer of Federal  Computer Weekly for an article about the shift of government agencies away from custom software development and towards the use of cloud computing.  The interest in this topic seemed to stem from the introduction of Apps.gov online store earlier this month.   Having been in the software cost estimation community for more than 25 years, I have experienced this transition first hand but never really stopped to think about the whys and wherefores until questioned by Doug.  It was an interesting stroll down memory lane.  As an example, ...
Original Post Date: Monday, July 20, 2009  Did you know that according to kgb a single Google search takes 0.2g of Carbon Dioxide? Asking Google 2 questions is equivalent to boiling a tea kettle full of water.  If there were 2 billion Google searches a day in 2008, today we're looking at more than 400 Million g of Carbon Dioxide a day just for Google searches.  A part of my job at PRICE is to look into emerging trends and technologies to determine if and how changes in the world impact the costs of hardware, software and information technology projects.  ...