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Original Post Date: Friday, June 3, 2011  If I Google the phrase “cloud computing” I get about 49,900,000 hits.  That’s a lot of hits – more than 10 times the hits I get if I Google “service oriented architecture.”  This made me think that cloud computing is an area I needed to learn more about. So what are we really talking about when we talk about cloud computing?  “The cloud” is a generally accepted euphemism for the Internet.  End users access computing assets from the cloud using a model similar to one that homes and offices use to get electricity ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, May 25, 2011  Going to ISPA SCEA in New Mexico?  If so, join us for a workshop on data driven cost estimating.  Description:  Building transparency and traceability into your estimating process leads to more defendable estimates.  This hands-on workshop demonstrates how historical data is transformed into predictive models.   You will learn how your organization’s data can be synthesized into custom models that can be employed in support of third party models within a single analytical framework.  Participants will learn:  (1)   To develop system level estimating relationships to provide a test of reasonableness and historical cross-check to proposed estimates. (2) To develop ...
Original Post Date: Thursday, May 19, 2011 I was recently asked by a client to provide a synopsis of what TruePlanning offers in response to the Ashton Carter Memorandum – Implementation of Will-Cost and Should-Cost Management. In the memo, the Undersecretary of Defense AT&L listed “Selected Ingredients of Should Cost Management”. It was interesting to note how much capability is provided by TruePlanning to effectively support efficient should cost management. In this month’s blog, I will share with my response to our client with you. ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 “I think we have an obligation to work with industry to ensure that our suppliers do not just remain world class in defence, but aspire to be world-class manufactures that can withstand comparison to other industries.” Chief of Defence Procurement, Sir Robert Walmsley Is this a practical proposition or is it a pipe dream?  The following excerpt from Dale Shermon’s Systems Cost Engineering attempts to make the case that this type of comparison is possible. Many of the statements in proposals and marketing literature stating the superiority of a company are anecdotal or at best qualitative ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 MCR and PRICE Systems are proud to sponsor the upcoming Estimating & Analysis Best Practice Workshop at the Marriott Manhattan Beach on April 27th from 7:30 am to 2:30 pm. This FREE workshop features government and industry speakers discussing how the current fiscal environment impacts the day-to-day estimating challenges faced by government program offices and their commercial counterparts.  These events seek to bring leaders together to share ideas and experiences about their most pressing issues. We are looking to professionals, such as you to contribute ideas and best practices.  For more information or to ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 ...wear the worst shoes. The cobbler was a master at his craft; he was just too tired to practice it when he got home from the shop.  Sound familiar? A disciplined approach to understanding (functional) requirements as well as analogous projects (with actuals) is our not-so-secret sauce. Why run the risk of creeping back up our career learning curve? There’s already enough scope creep to keep us busy. Plus, for you management types charged with prospecting, a consistent approach towards estimation is a great way to connect with people who've felt the pain of being the cobbler's kids. I recently reconnected ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 In Parametrics is Free, I acknowledged receiving (too late) “you should’ve known to ask that” over the years. Quality control after-the-fact is fine; but it’s better and cheaper to take a systematic approach to quality assurance as part of your estimating process. The sheer volume of what we model can often keep us so close to the details that we are unable to step back and put on our QA hat on for a sanity check. Enter Quality! On a very large project, our team has introduced a few regular cross-checks, notwithstanding typical math check-sums.   A round table peer ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 I’m not a golfer. But we’ve all heard one say “that’s why I play” after hitting a shot and feeling like it all came together. What “it” is, in terms of mechanics and timing, I’m not really sure.  In our own world of parametrics, it’s the feeling of adding value in that golden moment of facilitating decisions and forward momentum. We wear many hats: estimating, consulting, systems engineering...even cost accounting.  Building an AoA, ICE or ROM is where rubber-meets-the-road in regards to configurations and assumptions.  Not too long ago I was in a discussion with a number of Subject Matter Experts ...
Original Post Date: Monday, February 28, 2011 PRICE Systems recently accepted an assignment to complete a "Should Cost" estimate for a U.S. ally on a weapon system. The estimate included not only analysis on production costs, but also should cost on various operations and support costs. The only information provided by the client was quantity and time frame for production. A major ground rule for the estimate was that all data specific to the weapon system must come from publicly available information.  For example, mass, manufacturing process, and learning curve information must come from the public domain.  After reviewing the scope for the estimate, we decided to also ...
Original Post Date: Monday, February 28, 2011 What follows is PRICE's interpretation of the DOD-HDBK-343, which addresses design, construction and testing requirements for a type of space equipment. Within the document are specified several levels of Class Definitions for space programs, space vehicles and space experiments. The classes are briefly described below. Class A - High Priority, Minimum Risk Class B - Risk with Cost Compromises Economically Re-flyable or Repeatable Minimum Acquisition Cost HDBK-343, originally published in 1986, was reviewed and found to be still valid in 1992.  We can't due ...