Original Post Date: Monday, February 28, 2011

What follows is PRICE's interpretation of the DOD-HDBK-343, which addresses design, construction and testing requirements for a type of space equipment. Within the document are specified several levels of Class Definitions for space programs, space vehicles and space experiments. The classes are briefly described below.

  • Class A - High Priority, Minimum Risk
  • Class B - Risk with Cost Compromises
  • Economically Re-flyable or Repeatable
  • Minimum Acquisition Cost

HDBK-343, originally published in 1986, was reviewed and found to be still valid in 1992.  We can't due justice to the 79-page document in a blog, but we can give you a brief description of each class and PRICE's interpretation of the platform for those classes.
 

The PRICE Platform alters the cost estimating relationships (particularly in the development phase) between the groups of hours and cost within the model, and is used to describe the operating specification of the item being costed. For example, as the platform is increased, the amount of design hours (thus cost) changes to a higher proportion of the development cost. This reflects the extra specifications and tests needed to qualify the design for a given operating specification.  Electronic and structural complexities are also linked platform.  Thus, when considering the platform for a specific HDBK-343 Class, the estimator must also choose appropriate complexities.

Class and Platform Descriptions

  • Class A:  Defined as high-priority, minimum risk effort. Characteristics usually involve some combination of: high national prestige, long Life, high complexity, high use of redundancy, soft failure modes, independent qualification items, complete flight spares, highest cost, and a critical launch time.  This class is considered to use a Platform of 2.0 for UNMANNED equipment; 2.5 for MANNED equipment.  NOTE:  It is possible that this Platform may have a higher value IF a number of conditions force higher quality components, longer testing, and other conditions above the HDBK-343 descriptions for this class.
  • Class B:  Defined as a risk with cost compromises effort.  It is a high priority, medium-risk, with cost saving compromises made primarily in areas other than design and construction.  Characteristics usually involve a combination of: high national prestige, medium life, high complexity, soft failure modes, protoflight qualification, limited flight spares, limited use of redundancy, high cost, short schedule, and a critical launch time.         This class is considered to use a Platform of 1.9.  NOTE:   It is possible that this Platform may have a higher (or lower) value IF a number of conditions force different quality components, different testing, and other conditions varying the HDBK-343 descriptions for this class.
  • Class C:  Defined as economically re-flyable or repeatable.  It is a medium or higher risk effort, that is economically re-flyable or repeatable.  Characteristics usually involve a combination of: medium to high national prestige, short life, low to medium complexity, small size, single string designs, hard failure modes, very limited flight spares, medium cost, short schedule, and a non-critical launch time.  This class is considered to use a Platform of 1.8.  NOTE:  It is possible that this Platform may have a higher (or lower) value IF a number of conditions force different quality components, different testing, and other conditions varying the HDBK-343 descriptions for this class.
  • Class D:  Defined as a higher risk, minimum cost effort.  Characteristics usually involve a combination of: medium to low national prestige, short life, low complexity, small size, single string designs, simple interfaces, hard failure modes, and a non-critical launch time.    This class is considered to use a Platform of 1.7.  NOTE:  It is possible that this Platform may have a higher (or lower) value IF a number of conditions force different quality components, different testing, and other conditions varying the HDBK-343 descriptions for this class.

 If you need help with this or other aspects of parametric modeling, post a comment or reach out to our subject matter experts through help@pricesystems.com