• Predictive Analytics for Improved Cost Management  



Blog



Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 As promised in my last blog (“System and Assembly Objects in the context of Hardware AoAs”), the integration of Software COTS is a subtly different challenge.  Customers are typically presented with two scenarios:  integration within a single system and integration within a system of systems (“SoS”).  Both cases are handled well by TruePlanning™ with specific parameter choices that control multiple activities relevant to software integration.  As I’ve come to appreciate PRICE’s competitive advantage with our Framework’s approach to the latter SoS case, I thought describing these two scenarios would help allow you to ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 During a recent Analysis of Alternatives (“AoA”) consulting project, our customer asked that we provide more insight into TruePlanning’s System and Assembly objects, which in our AoA context we termed Systems Engineering/ Program Management (SE/PM) and Alternative Integration/ Test, respectively. The customer’s challenge was understanding our parametric model’s treatment of principally hardware-COTS objects, combined with other cost, purchased service and training objects.Our Chief Scientist, Arlene Minkiewicz, provided us with insights that I’d like to share with you, as well as my views on how we at PRICE systems have consistently used these parent ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 It is impossible to find a news website or magazine that is not full of articles on the effects of Sequestration.  As a cost estimator, I find the topic very interesting (and troublesome).  The immediate effects of Sequestration are widely discussed.  However, I do not see quite as much news coverage on the second and third order effects of this extremely complex policy decision. The Department of Defense (DoD) has a specific target that must be removed from the budget over the next 10 years.  Some analysts claim a doomsday scenario.  Others claim it ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 In a recent National Public Radio (NPR) interview, Winslow Wheeler (Director of the Straus Military Reform Project of the Project on Government Oversight in Washington, D.C.), spoke on the recent problems with the Joint Strike Fighter acquisition process.  “Wheeler explained that Lockheed Martin, the manufacturer of the jet, uses a pricing vocabulary that masks costs. ‘Flyaway costs, non-recurring and recurring costs, and lots of gobbledygook, and they’ll say that comes to a number like $60-$70 million dollars. And, it’s complete baloney,’ said Wheeler.” (pogo.org)    The F-35 has the distinction of being the most ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 “On 29 July 2003, the Acting Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) signed a policy memorandum entitled “Policy for Unique Identification (UID) of Tangible Items – New Equipment, Major Modifications, and Reprocurements of Equipment and Spares”. This Policy made UID a mandatory DoD requirement on all new equipment and materiel delivered pursuant to solicitations issued on or after January 1, 2004. USD(AT&L) issued verbal guidance that tangible assets manufactured by DoD’s organic depots were to be considered “new” items which fall under UID marking policy, beginning 1 January, 2005. An item is considered “significant”, and will be uniquely ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 What follows is PRICE's interpretation of how to model FPGA’s and ASICs inside our current version of TruePlanning® 2012 SR2 and older versions. ASICs are an application-specific integrated circuit, customized for a particular use. FPGAs are Field-programmable gate arrays and are considered the modern-day technology that can be used in many different applications because of the programmable logical blocks. In industry ASICs has grown from 5,000 gates to over 100 million. Designers of digital ASICs use a VHDL language for the functionality.   Estimating Best Practice for TruePlanning: Model your electronics at the board level ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 Last November I hosted a webinar that discussed the use of the companion applications Live! This session helped to further explain how to use them in congruence with TP, the history, & why we created them, etc. During the presentation I showcased the success’s I have encountered with using them both in the recent AOA I described in part 2 and this blog part 3. You can find the recorded webinar on our site. In addition I described as I am going to do here the differences between the large project engine and the excel ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 Every day we use tools like TruePlanning to build up detailed parametric cost estimates.  We could spend weeks collecting data and design information, and weeks honing details on risks and uncertainties.  When we finally get to reasonable point estimate, or even a distribution of probable estimates, there are always more questions.  Of course the range of queries depends on the purpose of the estimate, and who your consumer is.  If you are preparing an estimate for a competitive proposal, a company executive may be your consumer.  They may want to know, “What is the ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 After we spend time building up a point estimate, a cost estimator always has to do some additional work to break the estimate down into terms their estimate consumer will understand, or to perform different comparisons for various analyses.  Sometimes, you need to map the estimate into a Standard Work Breakdown Structure or Cost Element Structure.  Sometimes you want to compare to a bottom-up or grass-roots estimate.  Or, if you are planning budgets or manpower out into the future, you need details.  We have to speak a lot of languages in order to ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 I’ve recently had a number of users ask, “How do I model life cycle costs for a missile that just sits on a shelf?”  I had never actually tried to model this, but of course I know it’s possible.  So I turned to some of my fellow PRICE experts, and found that of course this is not the first time anyone has ever tried to model this kind of thing… Many ordnance weapons such as mortar shells, torpedoes, bombs, missiles and various projectiles are stockpiled until they are actually needed. These weapons ...