• Predictive Analytics for Improved Cost Management  



Blog



Check out the November/December issue of Crosstalk (http://www.crosstalkonline.org/issues/novdec-2016.html) “Beyond the Agile Manifesto.”  Here you will find several really great articles on the uses and the future of agile development.  As usual I started at the end with David Cook’s Backtalk article – “Too Agile for my Own Good”( http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/702523/27309805/1477697823283/201611-Cook.pdf?token=ayD00sE4rcknGJpn6XEk1O08YBk%3D).  Cook not only shared whimsical information about his favorite grocery items along with his curmudgeon-like  frustration with the stores insistence on changing things up occasionally by moving familiar items to unfamiliar locations throughout the store.  Cook admits however that this behavior – while originally annoying has resulted in improvements in the ...
Crowdsourcing is the practice of harnessing the power of the crowd to solve problems or accomplish certain tasks.  The expression Crowdsourcing was coined as a portmanteau of the words crowd and outsourcing.  While advances in technology have pushed this practice to the forefront recently – the notion has been around for a long time. It is a participative online activity where questions and tasks are proposed by an individual or organization via a particular crowdsourcing platform.  Individuals or groups of individuals who belong to that community – accept the challenge and attempt to answer the question or complete the proposed ...
One of the most frequently asked questions from new users is:  At what level should I be estimating my project in TruePlanning®?  To be clear, the question involves how detailed the product breakdown structure should be.  The answers can vary widely, as seen in the two examples below for an aircraft. Figure 1.  F-22 template available in TruePlanning® 2016 Note: subassemblies collapsed to fit PBS onto one page.   Figure 2.  F-22 estimated as one hardware cost object. The preceding examples might be extreme ends of a spectrum.  In the first example, we have provided a template in TruePlanning® 2016 that models a fighter ...
We have all likely heard of “should cost” estimates.  Boiled down: If everything goes as planned, how much should program cost?  Are there efficiencies or best practices we can employ to get the job done faster and cheaper?  We may use analogies, parametrics, bottom up estimates, or extrapolation of actual costs to make a determination.  How many of us have heard of “should price”?  “Should price” is the determination of reasonableness of price for commercial items.  When contracting personnel receive quotes for off-the-shelf items, they need tools at their disposal to determine if the item is fairly priced.  On ...
Recently, I was contacted by an Air Force estimator with a novel challenge.  The estimator’s product breakdown structure modeled the development and production of various hardware items over several years.  TruePlanning can easily assist in spreading production quantities or tracking “ship sets” of items required for a weapon system.  In this case, the user wished to have different quantities for different items.  Typically, we use a System cost object or the System Folder to spread production, which is then attributed to all components within the estimate.  Coming up with multiple production schedules within the same estimate presented a challenge. In ...
In the previous (second) blog in this series, we discussed using the NIST Special Publication 800-171 Appendix E to list all possible cyber security requirements.  We then down selected the entire list of 123 items into roughly 60 that may directly impact the software development process.  Now, we will cover how the impact of those 60 items could possibly be included in a TruePlanning® estimate. I will offer three primary methods for accounting for additional effort of cyber security requirements.  We will look at modeling the requirements as individual cost objects in the estimate.  We will then consider setting inputs ...
We will pick up where we left off on estimating the cost of cyber security by looking at requirements.  Recall from a previous blog that the requirements for Cyber Security are outlined in Appendix E of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication 800-171 document titled “Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal Information Systems and Organizations.”  In Appendix E, there are a series of tables that outline the requirement, as well as the responsible authority for ensuring those requirements are met.  There are four categories of requirements*: NCO: Not directly related to protecting ...
A recent article in the National Defense Magazine highlighted the ever increasing need for cyber security.  (See http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/articles/2016/12/12/pentagon-paying-more-to-be-hacked)  When working on a software estimate for a program office here at Wright-Patterson AFB, I was asked “how do you handle cyber security requirements?”  My response was, “What does that mean for your program?  How are the requirements different?”  There was no good answer.  We may be required to incorporate cyber security requirements into a new software project, but there is no really good guidance as to what that exactly means.  We can probably assume that costs are higher for a ...
We’ve added many cool new features to our Hardware estimating model in TruePlanning® 2016, and I’d like to introduce the new Learning Curve features in this blog. First, we’ve added the ability to pull out the theoretical cost of any individual production unit, anywhere along the learning curve.  We call it the “Nth Unit Cost” metric.  This has been requested by many users, notably Air Force users and aircraft manufacturers, where it is common to use the 100th unit cost as a reference point to compare different types of aircraft.  Simply enter a value for “N”, and the Metrics tab ...
TrueMapper strives to provide an environment that allows users to be as efficient as possible when creating mappings. Sometimes users need to map all of a specific type of Cost Object, Activity or Resource to specific WBS items. In this case users would use the “Generic” tab of the Mapping Assignment Window. Assignments made from this tab can be stored off in a *.tpgen file and used against any PBS structure. Recently, some TruePlanning users came across a situation where they needed to assign all Resources from specific Cost Objects to a specific WBS element, except one. Those familiar with ...