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Check out this article on “The History and Purpose of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM)” (https://toughnickel.com/business/The-History-and-Purpose-of-the-Capability-Maturity-Model-CMM) It provides an interesting and thought provoking accounting of how the Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU’s) Software Engineering Institute (SEI) came to be and how the quest of NASA and the US Air Force lead the charge to improve software quality.  According to the article – “The Capability Maturity Model was developed to ensure success when success really matters – at NASA and in the military where lives are on the line and success is survival”.  The problem the industry had with this quest ...
In the previous (second) blog in this series, we discussed using the NIST Special Publication 800-171 Appendix E to list all possible cyber security requirements.  We then down selected the entire list of 123 items into roughly 60 that may directly impact the software development process.  Now, we will cover how the impact of those 60 items could possibly be included in a TruePlanning® estimate. I will offer three primary methods for accounting for additional effort of cyber security requirements.  We will look at modeling the requirements as individual cost objects in the estimate.  We will then consider setting inputs ...
We will pick up where we left off on estimating the cost of cyber security by looking at requirements.  Recall from a previous blog that the requirements for Cyber Security are outlined in Appendix E of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication 800-171 document titled “Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal Information Systems and Organizations.”  In Appendix E, there are a series of tables that outline the requirement, as well as the responsible authority for ensuring those requirements are met.  There are four categories of requirements*: NCO: Not directly related to protecting ...
If you’ve taken my Software Training class, you’ve heard me use the analogy of “taking someone else’s spreadsheet and adding your own logic” to distinguish between modifications, adapted code and glue code.  But let’s take a step back to make sure we’re all in agreement {if not, blame me not the product!} #1.) To be clear, COTS is shrink-wrapped, ready-to-go with near-zero modification to core functionality.  Generally, we really prefer to see COTS modification no more than 10%. #2.) If this latter core functionality needs modification, then we recommend using the SW Component object with Adapted code, as well as Reused ...
In our last Part I blog, we introduced the capability of estimating key-input drivers based on early-stage metrics that represent requirements.  We even produced a CER based on a data-driven multiple regression, i.e., a linear model predicting Functional Complexity based only on two Key Performance Parameters (KPPs).  So how could you do the same?  Import the spreadsheet (given last time) into TrueFindings.  Note that spreadsheet row names now become the knowledgebase “column” fields.  Now per below, the first tab-function “Distribution Finder” shows descriptive statistics for all or selected criteria— The second tab-function “Dependency Finder” allow us to observe possible simple ...
Predicting cost from requirements is a fundamental goal of parametric estimating.  Many say they do it.  But often, analogies are not based on rigor and do not represent organizational experience/productivity not capture the complexity of project deliveries driven by requirements. TruePlanning allows for calibration of the latter.  TrueFindings allows for aggregation, filtering and analysis of these calibrations.  But then what?  How can this knowledge base of calibrated metrics best be utilized? The answer is aligning knowledge of corresponding requirements that drove the costs that informed the calibrations.  In this way, we predict an appropriate set of model input-drivers based on the organization and ...
Here’s a great blog about estimates. The first thing I liked about it was the author managed to quote Lewis Caroll in a blog about software estimation.  You can’t really go wrong if you can quote Lewis Caroll and invoke iconic memories about “Through the Looking Glass”.  The specific quote refers to the word “Estimate” and goes like this - “When I use a word it means just what I choose it to mean – neither more nor less.” The author posits that maybe before we perform an estimate, and certainly before we consume one – we should remind ourselves ...
Original Post Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2010 The first time I remember hearing the term, “data driven estimating,” was at an ISPA/SCEA conference in Phoenix about 6 years ago. I thought I had a pretty good concept of what that meant. Then, I started hearing it more frequently about 6 to 9 months ago, and I wasn’t as sure of my understanding. So, I went to the Internet and Googled, “Data Driven Estimating.”  The first 3 pages yield links to statistical, engineering, and technical estimating founded on data; e.g. packet routing, data delivery rate, radar and rain gage data, ...
Original Post Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 The GAO just published a report saying that strong leadership is key to planning and executing stable weapons programs. And, evidence is presented to back the claim, including result from study of a subset of the 21% of the 2008 defense programs that were deemed stable - on track with original estimates of cost and schedule. What kind of strong leadership made these programs stable? Things like experience, continuity, and open and honest communication, knowledge-based planning, disciplined execution of plans, and establishment of realistic cost and schedule estimates that account for risk are all cited.  Here’s ...
Original Post Date: Friday, July 9, 2010  While sitting in the operatory chair yesterday, my dentist said something that made me stop. He was complaining about an increasing rate of incompetence and apathy he observes in those delivering services to him. And while I do agree with him in principal, he and I are of the age where some folks label us as grumpy old men. So, it may not be as bad as we think. Regardless, the statement he said he made to the an unfortunate poor-quality service provider was, “If you don’t have the time to do it ...